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The Trouble with Patience

 

The Trouble with Patience by Maggie Brendan is the first book in a new series, Virtues and Vices of the Old West. Historical Fiction is my favorite genre to read and I had high hopes for this title. I only select books I feel will result in a positive review, mostly because I love to read! I must say upfront that this wasn’t a book I particularly enjoyed. I have a few ideas about who this book is ideal for, and I will share those thoughts in a bit.

From the back cover:

Patience Cavanaugh has lost hope in romance. The man she yearned to marry is dead and her dreams are gone with him. Now she is consumed with restoring a dilapidated boardinghouse in order to support herself.

Despite Patience’s desire for solitude, Jedediah Jones, the local marshal with a reputation for hanging criminals, becomes an ever-looming part of her life. It seems like such a simple arrangement: She needs someone with a strong back to help her fix up the boardinghouse. He needs a dependable source of food for himself and his prisoners. But as she gets to know this “hanging lawman,” Patience finds there is far more to him that meets the eye- and it could destroy their tenuous relationship forever.

Although it pains me to say so, this book is slow, full of predictable situations, and heavy on uninteresting dialogue. The romance between Patience and Jedediah isn’t very believable and worse than that, it is clear from the very beginning that they are to fall in love but spend little time doing so. I will be the first to admit I enjoy a love story where the characters get to know one another with some major page time! This is very much a “Duggar” style romance. And as a side note, I was just as disappointed to see Patience’s mother show up as she was in the story.

I do think this book has some admirable qualities. First, it is clean throughout.  I would not hesitate to allow a young reader to venture into this series. In fact, I could easily be convinced this title was intended for a young reader. Secondly, there is a theme of faith that is clear in this book. Another reason I would recommend The Trouble with Patience to a pre-teen/teen reader. 

While I would not list this title as a favorite, I am not writing off author Maggie Brendan.  I am hopeful I will find another of her titles I will love. I was given a complimentary copy of this book by its publisher, Revell, in exchange for an honest review. I have not been compensated and all opinions are my own.

 

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